Pros And Cons Of Being A Self Employed Tradesman


Being a tradesman is a rewarding job, but when it comes to establishing yourself as a business, you may have a lot of questions about whether is it worth it to go self-employed or simply find a job as a contractor with a firm.

Check out our blog here:

Going It Solo: Weighing Up The Pros & Cons Of Being A Self-Employed Tradesman

——-

Check out our expanded range of blogs, discussing a variety of different subjects from Tradesman Slang to Tradesman Apps:
https://www.tradesmansaver.co.uk/blog

——-

TRADESMAN SAVER SOCIAL MEDIA:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tradesmansaver/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradesman_saver
Google Plus : https://plus.google.com/+TradesmanSav…
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta…

——-

Music Credit Goes To:

Divider by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Attribution License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://chriszabriskie.com/licensing.
——-

Created By Tradesman Saver. All Rights Reserved.

Buy Tradesman Insurance here: here: https://www.tradesmansaver.co.uk/

Rental Property Insurance: Tips & Advice


Whether you’ve got a tiny rental next door to your home or a portfolio of 200 properties, understanding insurance and how it does and doesn’t protect your assets is key.

Here’s an overview:

THE THINGS YOUR PROTECTING
As a property owner, there are three primary things your insurance policy should protect:

PROPERTY COVERAGE
The most obvious coverage is for the structure itself. If something bad happens to your investment property it’s value is diminished. That could be a total loss like a fire or tornado leveling the structure. It could also be a partial loss like a burst pipe causing water damage to your wood floors.

This is listed as DWELLING coverage on your insurance policy.

There is very limited PERSONAL PROPERTY coverage on a Dwelling owner’s policy. This is because you don’t usually have belongings in the house. The personal property of your renter is NOT covered under your insurance policy. This is one reason for renters to have their own RENTER’S INSURANCE POLICY.

LIABILITY COVERAGE
The is coverage for bad things that happen to other people because of you or your property. Common examples are a person falling down the stairs, tripping on your sidewalk, or being injured by faulty construction.

The renters in your property are the most likely to experience these things. That’s why most rental contracts have “Hold Harmless” clauses. This is something you should talk to a lawyer about when creating your rental contract.

The second group of people to potentially experience injuries on your property are the friends and family of your renters. This is the most important reason to REQUIRE TENANTS TO HAVE A RENTER’S POLICY. Liability on a renter’s policy would be first to respond and make you less likely to experience a liability claim.

BUSINESS INCOME COVERAGE
The last of the three major coverages protects the income that you receive from a property. If there is damage that requires a renter to move out for a period of time, you likely won’t receive rent payments. Business Income coverage replaces that lost income.

MARKET VALUE VS REPLACEMENT COST
The DWELLING COVERAGE is the maximum limit an insurance company would pay out for damage to your property. Many investors think this has something to do will how much your property is worth. That is incorrect. The Dwelling coverage is figured based on REPLACEMENT COST. Replacement Cost is the estimated amount it would actually cost to rebuild the structure. The figure includes contractors, wood, drywall, roofing, etc.

Sometimes Market Value and Replacement Cost are close. Other times they are significantly different. For example, let’s say you buy a 2000 square foot house for 0,000. The insurance company will likely want to insure it for around 0,000 (5/square foot). You may feel like the insurance company is insuring it for way too much but the reality is you bought the house for much less than it would cost to rebuild. Market Value & Replacement Cost are not the same thing.

COINSURANCE CLAUSE
You might say, “I don’t care. I bought the house for 0,000, let’s insure it for 0,000.” You wouldn’t be the first person to think that. Maybe you don’t even care if 0,000 is all you’d get in a claim. But actually, you wouldn’t even get that.
Insurance companies have a rule to combat underinsuring a house and it’s called the COINSURANCE CLAUSE.

In a claim, EVEN A SMALL ONE, the company will assess whether you’re dwelling coverage properly insures the house. If it doesn’t, a formula is used that diminishes the claim payout in direct relation to how much you underinsured.

In the above example, if the house totally burned down you’d get about ,000.

PERILS INSURED AGAINST
Insurance coverage is based on the bad thing that happened (occurrence). Different policies list different events that are (or aren’t covered). Here’s the 3 primary options:
o BASIC (DP1) – Covers 11 “Named Perils” including lighting, fire, smoke, wind, hail, and more.

o BROAD (DP2) – Covers 16 “Named Perils” including everything from Basic plus burst pipes, weight of ice and snow, and more

o SPECIAL (DP3) – The best kind. Shifts from what is covered to what ISN’T covered. If a bad thing that happens isn’t specifically excluded it’s covered.

That’s it! What are your questions? Please ask them in the comments section below!!

Learn more about us at:
Our Site – www.shineinsurance.com
Our Blog – www.shineinsure.com/blog
Our Podcast – www.scratchentrepreneur.com
Our Course – www.newhomebuyersguide.net